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Motivation To Take Action Ebook

Earn 75% On Revolutionary Self-help Workbook With A Unique, Innovative Blog Platform. Send Targeted Traffic And See For Yourself How This Converts. Your Customers Learn How To Take Action And Stay Motivated To The Life Of Their Dreams In 100 Days.

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July 29, 2017 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , | Leave a comment

Linked Into Action

Linkedin Is The #1 Professional Networking Site. This Linkedin Course Will Create Sales, Web Traffic And Success For Business Owners, Entrepreneurs, Professionals And Job Seekers. Solid 6 Hours Of Video From A Well-known Linkedin Expert, Author & Speaker

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May 25, 2017 Posted by | Uncategorized | , | Leave a comment

Download Your Free Small Business Saturday Action Plan

Last year, more than 100 million people supported their local merchants by shopping at small businesses on Small Business Saturday.

Small businesses increased their customer bases and saw a jump in sales of 100% and higher after last year’s nationwide day of support.

Are you participating this year? Even if it’s a last-minute decision, you can leverage the benefits of Small Business Saturday in a big way next weekend. We’ve got you covered with everything you need to know to publicize your business for November 24th.

It’s a busy time of year for everyone, business owners included.

Small Business Saturday is next weekend, but don’t panic if you’re not prepared yet. This free downloadable action plan will tell you what to do now, on the day of, and even after the big day to follow up with new customers.

Here are a few more ideas to get you on your way to a successful Small Business Saturday promotion.

Get on Foursquare

Foursquare is partnered with American Express to reward cardholders for shopping at local establishments. The credit card company offers check-in specials at a number of small businesses, rewarding cardholders with money back when they check into the establishment.

If you’re not already listed on Foursquare, claim your business now. You’ll get free exposure as shoppers share their Foursquare checkins on their social networks.

You can also offer specials of your own to encourage more people to check in while shopping at your store. Many businesses offer discounts to people who check in with a certain number of friends on Foursquare. Encourage customers to bring their friends along on Small Business Saturday for better deals.

Promote Your Holiday Sales

If you’re already planning sales for the holiday season, launch them on the 24th. Small Business Saturday is the Black Friday for local merchants, so shoppers will be looking for deals.

Use Small Business Saturday to start your holiday promotions and remind your customers that your sales continue all season long. You could even print flyers with your holiday sale schedule and place them in your customers’ bags at check-out, similar to this business owner’s successful strategy last year.

Partner With Other Local Businesses

Small Business Saturday is a national event that celebrates local businesses. So get together with your fellow business owners to make it a big day in your town.

Here are some ideas to get you started:

Run a joint promotion. Customers who bring receipts or get cards punched from neighboring stores get a special discount at your own store.Decorate your block. Attract customers with a festive atmosphere while they do their holiday shopping.Give shoppers a memorable experience. Get creative with it. How about a progressive lunch in each store on your block? Or take turns manning warm drink stations on the sidewalk. Work together to plan something that will make a big impression on local shoppers.

Encourage Customers to Review You

The extra foot traffic in your store is the perfect opportunity to get more reviews from customers on Yelp and Google Places.

Post signs throughout your store and in your windows to let customers know you’re on these sites. Keep a stack of cards near the register to remind customers to review their experience after they leave. It’s not a good idea to offer incentives or discounts for reviews, but there’s no harm in placing gentle reminders for new customers.

Don’t Forget an Email Signup!

You may have a lot of new faces in your store next Saturday – and they’re not on your email list yet. Have an email sign up ready and tell new customers about the benefits of joining your list.

If you have an iPad, you can set up a quick and easy email signup at your register with the OnSpot app. Customers can instantly add themselves to your email list when you connect the app to your AWeber account.

You can also take a low-tech approach with signup sheets, or print out cards with a URL to your signup page. Slip a card into every customer’s bag when they checkout so they can join your list when they get home.

Grab your free action plan and tell us what you’re doing for Small Business Saturday in the comments!

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February 8, 2015 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , | Leave a comment

5 Fundamentals of a Social-Media Action Plan

5 Fundamentals of a Social-Media Action Plan

As I get more involved in social media for business — I’m doing a lot of that lately — I can see more each day that the new business landscape social media creates is a significant change, a good thing for a lot of businesses, but still something that depends on fundamentals. Whether it’s for marketing, sales, customer service, fulfillment, or some other business purpose, when social media is part of what a business is doing, it should be managed by planning and follow-up.

With that in mind, here’s my suggestion for the elements of a social-media action plan:

1. Goals
What’s the problem? What are you trying to achieve? Start by stating that out loud, defining it, and writing it down. It may seem like too obvious but real business happens over time, with actions, not just in meetings. Setting the context correctly matters.

For example, social media for your business might be a matter of generating and publishing content to attract visitors to your website, where they buy services. It might also be about publishing information, like the whereabouts of the taco truck. Or it might be to deal with complaints, like bad reviews. Maybe it’s like sales collateral, helping to close sales by positioning the business and its expertise. Start your plan by stating the goal.

2. Actions
Having defined the goals, how are you going to achieve them? What specifically do you want to do? An action plan must have specific concrete steps that need to be taken. For social media, that would be actions like setting up accounts, developing graphics for the different pages, defining what kinds of updates should be done, on which platform, and others. How many tweets are required? How many are too many? Do you post the same thing exactly on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn? What kind of content gets liked or retweeted? What’s supposed to happen?

Related: What You Can Learn from Celebrities About Social Media

3. Measurement
As the plan gets going, and business gets going, how will you know if your plan is even working? How will you judge performance? How will you compare your plan to your actual results in order to review and revise your plan?

All of that takes establishing the measurement — the numbers — as you develop your plan. Don’t worry about guessing the future correctly, because nobody does. Just make the assumptions logical and the guesses numerical, so you can test them when you’re underway, and revise them as results come. Standard numbers for measuring social media could be traffic generated, tweets, updates, likes, retweets, increase in sales, orders for special deals, or even the interesting social-media measurements like Klout or peer index that combine numbers into theoretical measurement of influence or impact.

4. Committing the people
Committees, groups, and meetings don’t actually do anything for a real business. It takes people. So an action plan includes very clearly defined tasks and responsibilities. Who does what? Make that explicit. Beware of the dangers of having multiple people involved in a solution, without any one person committed to doing something.

Related: How to Mine Social Networks for Valuable Customer Data

Develop commitment, not just involvement. Compare the role of the pig to the role of the chicken in the classic bacon-and-egg breakfast: The chicken is involved, the pig is committed.

The social-media action plan should define who’s doing what. Is it one person on Twitter and another on Facebook? Is one gathering and curating content and another watching complaints? Who does the messaging? Who develops blog posts? Spell it out.

5. Tracking and following up
Like everything in planning for business, the social-media action plan is only as good as the actions it causes. Goals, actions, tracking, and people lead to a review-and-revise session scheduled in advance on a regular basis, like once a month. Look at the plan, compare it to actual results, discuss the reasons for the difference between plan and actual, and revise the plan. This also includes reviewing performance of the individuals and specific tasks against their numeric measurement. At this point, it’s called management.

Related: 5 Scary Mistakes to Avoid on Facebook

Read more stories about: Social media, Social media marketing

Did you find this story helpful? YesNo Thanks for making Entrepreneur better for everyone.

View the original article here

October 7, 2014 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , | Leave a comment

5 Fundamentals of a Social-Media Action Plan

5 Fundamentals of a Social-Media Action Plan

As I get more involved in social media for business — I’m doing a lot of that lately — I can see more each day that the new business landscape social media creates is a significant change, a good thing for a lot of businesses, but still something that depends on fundamentals. Whether it’s for marketing, sales, customer service, fulfillment, or some other business purpose, when social media is part of what a business is doing, it should be managed by planning and follow-up.

With that in mind, here’s my suggestion for the elements of a social-media action plan:

1. Goals
What’s the problem? What are you trying to achieve? Start by stating that out loud, defining it, and writing it down. It may seem like too obvious but real business happens over time, with actions, not just in meetings. Setting the context correctly matters.

For example, social media for your business might be a matter of generating and publishing content to attract visitors to your website, where they buy services. It might also be about publishing information, like the whereabouts of the taco truck. Or it might be to deal with complaints, like bad reviews. Maybe it’s like sales collateral, helping to close sales by positioning the business and its expertise. Start your plan by stating the goal.

2. Actions
Having defined the goals, how are you going to achieve them? What specifically do you want to do? An action plan must have specific concrete steps that need to be taken. For social media, that would be actions like setting up accounts, developing graphics for the different pages, defining what kinds of updates should be done, on which platform, and others. How many tweets are required? How many are too many? Do you post the same thing exactly on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn? What kind of content gets liked or retweeted? What’s supposed to happen?

Related: What You Can Learn from Celebrities About Social Media

3. Measurement
As the plan gets going, and business gets going, how will you know if your plan is even working? How will you judge performance? How will you compare your plan to your actual results in order to review and revise your plan?

All of that takes establishing the measurement — the numbers — as you develop your plan. Don’t worry about guessing the future correctly, because nobody does. Just make the assumptions logical and the guesses numerical, so you can test them when you’re underway, and revise them as results come. Standard numbers for measuring social media could be traffic generated, tweets, updates, likes, retweets, increase in sales, orders for special deals, or even the interesting social-media measurements like Klout or peer index that combine numbers into theoretical measurement of influence or impact.

4. Committing the people
Committees, groups, and meetings don’t actually do anything for a real business. It takes people. So an action plan includes very clearly defined tasks and responsibilities. Who does what? Make that explicit. Beware of the dangers of having multiple people involved in a solution, without any one person committed to doing something.

Related: How to Mine Social Networks for Valuable Customer Data

Develop commitment, not just involvement. Compare the role of the pig to the role of the chicken in the classic bacon-and-egg breakfast: The chicken is involved, the pig is committed.

The social-media action plan should define who’s doing what. Is it one person on Twitter and another on Facebook? Is one gathering and curating content and another watching complaints? Who does the messaging? Who develops blog posts? Spell it out.

5. Tracking and following up
Like everything in planning for business, the social-media action plan is only as good as the actions it causes. Goals, actions, tracking, and people lead to a review-and-revise session scheduled in advance on a regular basis, like once a month. Look at the plan, compare it to actual results, discuss the reasons for the difference between plan and actual, and revise the plan. This also includes reviewing performance of the individuals and specific tasks against their numeric measurement. At this point, it’s called management.

Related: 5 Scary Mistakes to Avoid on Facebook

Read more stories about: Social media, Social media marketing

Did you find this story helpful? YesNo Thanks for making Entrepreneur better for everyone.

View the original article here

April 13, 2014 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , | Leave a comment

Photos in Email: Get More Subscriber Action

Over half of email readers turn on images in the emails they receive. Surprised? Combine this with Email Marketing Reports’ study on how image-heavy emails can outperform the alternatives with the right execution, and you’d be right to think twice about sticking to your plain text, no-frills design strategy.

If you’re ready to start incorporating more images in your emails, you’re in luck. First, AWeber offers image hosting so you can easily upload any of your photos to use in your emails. And second, we love to share ideas that will help our readers’ with their emails.

So today, we have several examples of businesses using images in ways that make sense while also being fun and effective. Take a look, get some ideas, and use the image hosting option to upload your own images.

A fun email by Indigo Wild

Here is a colorful email from Indigo Wild, a natural products store. The first image is a lot of fun; anytime you can incorporate a pet into your images it’s guaranteed you’ll get some smiles.

But Indigo Wild also gets down to business with photos of their actual products for sale. When people are making a decision on whether to buy or not, consumers prefer to see what it is they’re buying before clicking that “Purchase” button.

An email by Dr. Susan Rubin that includes a cartoon

This email is entertaining. Dr. Susan Rubin does something similar to Indigo Wild with the fun, personal photo at the top. She also included a cartoon, which is very eye-catching and amusing.

Surprise your readers with something purely for entertainment. You can find and upload something you found to be funny (make sure you give proper credit by including your source) or use Apple app Paper by FiftyThree or bitstrips.com to make your own cartoon. You can also use a program like Skitch to mark up images.

Mazzone True Value's email, featuring event photos

Mazzone True Value sent this email out to let people know about their PumpkinFest. Hosting events such as these are an effective way to establish customer relationships and also attract new customers.

By sharing pictures of the event, Mazzone is establishing themselves as a people-friendly business. Those that attended the event will be excited to see if there are photos of themselves while others will enjoy the candid, non-stock images.

An email by Chef Tony, featuring delicious dishes

Chef Tony wants to get people to eat in his restaurant. So what does he do? He sends coupons with photos of his food and restaurant. This makes sense – it’s a way to show off his product – and it’s also highly effective in getting tummies rumbling.

All Chef Tony had to do was snap some photos of the delicious creations he was cooking up and upload them into his emails. Subscribers who have eaten at the restaurant may think “Yes, that was the best dish I ever had. I must go back!” while new customers may think, “That looks like it will be the best dish I ever had. I must try it!”

Follow these instructions to easily start uploading your own photos and using them in email. You can also check out Smashing Magazine’s “How To Use Photos To Sell More Online.”

What do you think would be good to share?

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March 7, 2014 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , | Leave a comment

5 Fundamentals of a Social-Media Action Plan

5 Fundamentals of a Social-Media Action Plan

As I get more involved in social media for business — I’m doing a lot of that lately — I can see more each day that the new business landscape social media creates is a significant change, a good thing for a lot of businesses, but still something that depends on fundamentals. Whether it’s for marketing, sales, customer service, fulfillment, or some other business purpose, when social media is part of what a business is doing, it should be managed by planning and follow-up.

With that in mind, here’s my suggestion for the elements of a social-media action plan:

1. Goals
What’s the problem? What are you trying to achieve? Start by stating that out loud, defining it, and writing it down. It may seem like too obvious but real business happens over time, with actions, not just in meetings. Setting the context correctly matters.

For example, social media for your business might be a matter of generating and publishing content to attract visitors to your website, where they buy services. It might also be about publishing information, like the whereabouts of the taco truck. Or it might be to deal with complaints, like bad reviews. Maybe it’s like sales collateral, helping to close sales by positioning the business and its expertise. Start your plan by stating the goal.

2. Actions
Having defined the goals, how are you going to achieve them? What specifically do you want to do? An action plan must have specific concrete steps that need to be taken. For social media, that would be actions like setting up accounts, developing graphics for the different pages, defining what kinds of updates should be done, on which platform, and others. How many tweets are required? How many are too many? Do you post the same thing exactly on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn? What kind of content gets liked or retweeted? What’s supposed to happen?

Related: What You Can Learn from Celebrities About Social Media

3. Measurement
As the plan gets going, and business gets going, how will you know if your plan is even working? How will you judge performance? How will you compare your plan to your actual results in order to review and revise your plan?

All of that takes establishing the measurement — the numbers — as you develop your plan. Don’t worry about guessing the future correctly, because nobody does. Just make the assumptions logical and the guesses numerical, so you can test them when you’re underway, and revise them as results come. Standard numbers for measuring social media could be traffic generated, tweets, updates, likes, retweets, increase in sales, orders for special deals, or even the interesting social-media measurements like Klout or peer index that combine numbers into theoretical measurement of influence or impact.

4. Committing the people
Committees, groups, and meetings don’t actually do anything for a real business. It takes people. So an action plan includes very clearly defined tasks and responsibilities. Who does what? Make that explicit. Beware of the dangers of having multiple people involved in a solution, without any one person committed to doing something.

Related: How to Mine Social Networks for Valuable Customer Data

Develop commitment, not just involvement. Compare the role of the pig to the role of the chicken in the classic bacon-and-egg breakfast: The chicken is involved, the pig is committed.

The social-media action plan should define who’s doing what. Is it one person on Twitter and another on Facebook? Is one gathering and curating content and another watching complaints? Who does the messaging? Who develops blog posts? Spell it out.

5. Tracking and following up
Like everything in planning for business, the social-media action plan is only as good as the actions it causes. Goals, actions, tracking, and people lead to a review-and-revise session scheduled in advance on a regular basis, like once a month. Look at the plan, compare it to actual results, discuss the reasons for the difference between plan and actual, and revise the plan. This also includes reviewing performance of the individuals and specific tasks against their numeric measurement. At this point, it’s called management.

Related: 5 Scary Mistakes to Avoid on Facebook

Read more stories about: Social media, Social media marketing

Did you find this story helpful? YesNo Thanks for making Entrepreneur better for everyone.

View the original article here

June 30, 2013 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , | Leave a comment

5 Fundamentals of a Social-Media Action Plan

5 Fundamentals of a Social-Media Action Plan

As I get more involved in social media for business — I’m doing a lot of that lately — I can see more each day that the new business landscape social media creates is a significant change, a good thing for a lot of businesses, but still something that depends on fundamentals. Whether it’s for marketing, sales, customer service, fulfillment, or some other business purpose, when social media is part of what a business is doing, it should be managed by planning and follow-up.

With that in mind, here’s my suggestion for the elements of a social-media action plan:

1. Goals
What’s the problem? What are you trying to achieve? Start by stating that out loud, defining it, and writing it down. It may seem like too obvious but real business happens over time, with actions, not just in meetings. Setting the context correctly matters.

For example, social media for your business might be a matter of generating and publishing content to attract visitors to your website, where they buy services. It might also be about publishing information, like the whereabouts of the taco truck. Or it might be to deal with complaints, like bad reviews. Maybe it’s like sales collateral, helping to close sales by positioning the business and its expertise. Start your plan by stating the goal.

2. Actions
Having defined the goals, how are you going to achieve them? What specifically do you want to do? An action plan must have specific concrete steps that need to be taken. For social media, that would be actions like setting up accounts, developing graphics for the different pages, defining what kinds of updates should be done, on which platform, and others. How many tweets are required? How many are too many? Do you post the same thing exactly on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn? What kind of content gets liked or retweeted? What’s supposed to happen?

Related: What You Can Learn from Celebrities About Social Media

3. Measurement
As the plan gets going, and business gets going, how will you know if your plan is even working? How will you judge performance? How will you compare your plan to your actual results in order to review and revise your plan?

All of that takes establishing the measurement — the numbers — as you develop your plan. Don’t worry about guessing the future correctly, because nobody does. Just make the assumptions logical and the guesses numerical, so you can test them when you’re underway, and revise them as results come. Standard numbers for measuring social media could be traffic generated, tweets, updates, likes, retweets, increase in sales, orders for special deals, or even the interesting social-media measurements like Klout or peer index that combine numbers into theoretical measurement of influence or impact.

4. Committing the people
Committees, groups, and meetings don’t actually do anything for a real business. It takes people. So an action plan includes very clearly defined tasks and responsibilities. Who does what? Make that explicit. Beware of the dangers of having multiple people involved in a solution, without any one person committed to doing something.

Related: How to Mine Social Networks for Valuable Customer Data

Develop commitment, not just involvement. Compare the role of the pig to the role of the chicken in the classic bacon-and-egg breakfast: The chicken is involved, the pig is committed.

The social-media action plan should define who’s doing what. Is it one person on Twitter and another on Facebook? Is one gathering and curating content and another watching complaints? Who does the messaging? Who develops blog posts? Spell it out.

5. Tracking and following up
Like everything in planning for business, the social-media action plan is only as good as the actions it causes. Goals, actions, tracking, and people lead to a review-and-revise session scheduled in advance on a regular basis, like once a month. Look at the plan, compare it to actual results, discuss the reasons for the difference between plan and actual, and revise the plan. This also includes reviewing performance of the individuals and specific tasks against their numeric measurement. At this point, it’s called management.

Related: 5 Scary Mistakes to Avoid on Facebook

Read more stories about: Social media, Social media marketing

Did you find this story helpful? YesNo Thanks for making Entrepreneur better for everyone.

View the original article here

December 31, 2012 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , | 1 Comment

   

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